The Blog

5 Dog Myths Totally Busted

5. Greyhounds don't make good pets.

It's sometimes assumed that Greyhounds make bad pets due to a belief that they require extra special exercise or that they have an uncontrollable urge to chase things. Wrong. Greyhounds are no different to other dog breeds that are popular in family homes. In fact there is a significant swell of the dog owning population who, having taken on a Greyhound, refuse to consider any other breed after falling in love with the charm and unrivalled loyalty from this largely misunderstood breed. Find Greyhounds for adoption near you.

4. The myth of the so-called 'alpha dog'.

It's true, in a dog pack there tends to be a hierarchical structure to the canine family. However, many people are confused when it comes to trying to play the role of the 'alpha dog'. Dogs are smart enough to understand the species difference between humans and their own kind so for those owners who are trying to take on dog-like traits and behaviours in order to convince their domesticated pet canine that they are in fact not only a real-life dog, but a real-life alpha dog, this can cause confusion in the dog's mind. Us humans are preordained 'alphas'. Dogs have been selectively bred for long enough that they come pre-programmed, as it were, to accept us as the 'dominant' species. You can read more about the alpha dog myth here.

3. Pit bull myths

There's probably not enough room in all of cyber space to list the many myths about pit bull type dogs and their relations in the bullbreed family. But this article gives a good account of some of the more common myths about pit bulls (such as the locking jaw).

2. Dog age in human years myth

Conventional wisdom has been that one human year equals seven dog years. Guess what? Myth! Dog years and human learning speeds are not so easily pigeon holed. This article explains the myths about dog years vs human years – check it out and find out your dog's REAL age in human years.

1. The hypoallergenic dog myth

Let's get one thing straight, out in the open and on the record. There is no such thing as a truly hypoallergenic dog. Given the fact that dog allergies tend to be triggered by dog skin, not dog hair per se, then for a dog to be truly hypoallergenic it would need to be skinless, not hairless. It's true that some breeds shed less than others and these breeds, as a result, do not trigger allergic reactions in those susceptible to dog allergies in the first place. But a truly hypoallergenic dog? Simply no such thing. Read here about low shedding dog breeds.

xxx
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

To Top